Saturday, December 13, 2014

Chicago Public Library's Best (Informational) Books of 2014

Chicago Public Library recommends the very best nonfiction published for kids in K-3rd grade in 2014. Congratulations Jennifer Ward and Katheryn Russell-Brown included on this prestigious list! See the complete list at the Chicago Public Library website.


Monday, December 08, 2014

A star for DRUM DREAM GIRL!

An amazing **starred review** for DRUM DREAM GIRL from Kirkus Reviews---congratulations Margarita and Rafael! 

KIRKUS REVIEW December 15, 2014 issue  

 

Pura Belpré winner and Newbery honoree Engle, known for writing free-verse historical fiction, introduces readers to Millo Castro Zaldarriaga with this illustrated poem, inspired by her subject’s childhood. 

 

Millo became a world-famous musician at quite a young age. Before fame, however, as Engle’s account attests, there is struggle. Millo longs to play the drums, but in 1930s Cuba, drumming is taboo for girls, “so the drum dream girl / had to keep dreaming / quiet / secret / drumbeat / dreams.” This doesn’t stop Millo; she dares to let her talent soar, playing every type of drum that she can find. Her sisters invite her to join their all-girl band, but their father refuses to allow Millo to play the drums. Eventually, her father softens, connecting her with a music teacher who determines that her talent is strong enough to override the social stigma. The rhythmic text tells Millo’s story and its significance in minimal words, with a lyricism that is sure to engage both young children and older readers. López’s illustrations are every bit as poetic as the narrative, a color-saturated dreamscape that Millo dances within, pounding and tapping her drums. Though it’s not explicit in the text, her mixed Chinese-African-Cuban descent is hinted at in the motifs López includes.


A beautiful account of a young girl’s bravery and her important contribution toward gender equality in the creative arts. (historical note) (Picture book. 3-8)

DRUM DREAM GIRL will release in March 2015 from Houghton Miflin Harcourt. Visit Rafael's blog for a studio tour as he worked on the book. Can't wait to see Margarita and Rafael's first book together out in the world! 


Monday, November 24, 2014

LITTLE MELBA AND HER BIG TROMBONE is a SLJ AND Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2014!!

 

We are thrilled to announce that LITTLE MELBA AND HER BIG TROMBONE by Katheryn Russell-Brown, illustrated by Frank Morrison (Lee & Low) has been named a Best Book of the Year by both School Library Journal AND Kirkus Reviews!


School Library Journal hails the book's "euphonious text and kinetic oil paintings," while Kirkus Reviews declares: "Readers will agree that “Melba Doretta Liston was something special”!

Congratulations on all the well-deserved accolades, Katheryn Russell-Brown! 

Monday, November 17, 2014

We support WE NEED DIVERSE BOOKS


We've donated to the WE NEED DIVERSE BOOKS campaign (on behalf of our next generation of readers, especially the two young sons of our agents!) and are also supporting the fund-raising campaign with some exciting perks from Full Circle Literary for donations. These are available for a limited time, and subject to change.

So if you haven't donated yet, we'd encourage to visit the We Need Diverse Books website and #WeNeedDiverseBooks to learn more now. As a literary agency that has long-supported diversity, we're proud to support their important work!


Saturday, November 15, 2014

ASK MY MOOD RING featured at fall Scholastic book fairs nationwide

Thrilled to share the ASK MY MOOD RING HOW I FEEL video created by Scholastic --- put on your mood ring and pickup a copy of this wonderful book at your local School Book Fair during this fall's Scholastic Book Fairs! Preview the video here:




Visit Diana Lopez's website for more information about her books, free downloadable discussion guides (great for mother-daughter book clubs!) and upcoming events. Currently, Diana is hard at work writing her next middle grade novel for Little Brown coming in 2016. More details to come!

Praise for ASK MY MOOD RING HOW I FEEL:

 A Bank Street College Best Book of 2014
A VOYA Top Shelf for Middle School Readers Pick
2nd Place Winner of the 2014 NACCS Tejas Award


  • A VOYA Top Shelf for Middle School Readers Pick
    2nd Place Winner of the 2014 NACCS Tejas Award for Young Adult Fiction
    A Bank Street College Children's Book Committee Best Book of 2014 Selection

    "A funny and heartfelt story...Balancing the heavy subject matter with generous doses of humor and an authentic young teen voice, López crafts a story that blends family and middle school drama successfully."
    (Kirkus Reviews).
  • "López (Choke) skillfully balances emotional moments with humorous ones, offering an honest portrait of a family under strain. Chia's clever, cheeky voice and a strong cast contribute to an inspiring story about developing "a special kind of bravery." (Publishers Weekly).
  • "The many characters in Chia's life are individually and lovingly drawn...Readers will feel like Chia's family and friends could do anything as long as they stick together-and they may be right." (Booklist ).
  • "Chia's voice shines...A fast-moving, absorbing read about how one person's illness can affect the whole family in many different ways."
    (School Library Journal).
  • - See more at: http://www.hachettebookgroup.com/titles/diana-lopez/ask-my-mood-ring-how-i-feel/9780316209960/#sthash.S4wiD8d6.dpuf


  • A VOYA Top Shelf for Middle School Readers Pick
    2nd Place Winner of the 2014 NACCS Tejas Award for Young Adult Fiction
    A Bank Street College Children's Book Committee Best Book of 2014 Selection

    "A funny and heartfelt story...Balancing the heavy subject matter with generous doses of humor and an authentic young teen voice, López crafts a story that blends family and middle school drama successfully."
    (Kirkus Reviews).
  • "López (Choke) skillfully balances emotional moments with humorous ones, offering an honest portrait of a family under strain. Chia's clever, cheeky voice and a strong cast contribute to an inspiring story about developing "a special kind of bravery." (Publishers Weekly).
  • "The many characters in Chia's life are individually and lovingly drawn...Readers will feel like Chia's family and friends could do anything as long as they stick together-and they may be right." (Booklist ).
  • "Chia's voice shines...A fast-moving, absorbing read about how one person's illness can affect the whole family in many different ways."
    (School Library Journal).
  • - See more at: http://www.hachettebookgroup.com/titles/diana-lopez/ask-my-mood-ring-how-i-feel/9780316209960/#sthash.S4wiD8d6.dpuf

    "López skillfully balances emotional moments with humorous ones, offering an honest portrait of a family under strain. Chia’s clever, cheeky voice and a strong cast contribute to an inspiring story about developing 'a special kind of bravery.'" Publishers Weekly


    “A funny and heartfelt story about a girl dealing with the trials of middle school and her mother’s breast cancer.”  Kirkus Reviews

    New York Times reviews "inspiring YA memoir" TAKING FLIGHT!


    Sunday Book Review | Children's Books




    "I wanted to dance wherever I went." Credit From "Taking Flight"
    “It’s a miracle I’m even here,” says Michaela DePrince in “First Position,” the 2011 documentary about aspiring ballet dancers. “Everywhere you looked, you saw someone die.” She wears a tutu and pointe shoes, about to go onstage, a picture of straight-backed ballerina calm. But the story she tells — now in greater detail in her inspiring Y.A. memoir, “Taking Flight” — is one of almost unimaginable turmoil and out-of-the-blue good fortune, much like the fairy-tale dances she now performs.

    Born Mabinty Bangura in war-ravaged Sierra Leone in 1995, DePrince suffered more in her first four years than most children who will encounter this book could ever understand. When she was about 3, rebels killed her beloved father at the diamond mine where he worked; her mother died of disease and starvation soon after. Because of her precocious intelligence, as well as the skin condition vitiligo, her cruel uncle thought she was a bad-luck “devil child” and brought her to an orphanage. There she became No. 27, the least favored child among a pretty unfortunate crew.

    Perhaps mindful of potential young readers, or perhaps simply too traumatized, DePrince describes her early years in almost emotionless language. But there is horror enough. When the orphans are forced to flee to nearby Guinea, she writes, they trekked past “hundreds of dead bodies . . . sprawled on the ground with their eyes and mouths open in terror.”

    DePrince brought just one treasure with her on this journey, a page from a magazine she had found showing a “white lady . . . wearing a very short, glittering pink skirt that stuck out all around her.” That ballerina photo, she writes, was one of the only things “that reminded me I was alive,” and it was practically the first thing she showed her adoptive mother when they met.

    Continue reading the complete New York Times Book Review here, and visit the website to view the inspiring book video. 
     

    Full Circle Literary © 2011

    Blogger Templates by Splashy Templates